In all seriousness...

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6 years 11 months ago #42287 by Bradley
Bradley replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...
Wow!! That sounds like a pretty fancy bike.:-P

Long Live the Fest!!

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6 years 11 months ago #42260 by penguin
penguin replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...
I'm selling off everything I own and getting 650B's, but I'm waiting for the 3 x 25 drivetrains to come out. if 10 is good, 11 must be better and 25 will rock! If will feature carbon fiber belt drive, on the fly air adjustments for wheels and shocks and shifting will be computer controlled via a gps system. Frame and wheels with a 250mm travel fork will weigh just under 5 lbs.
Cost will be $40,000 but it's worth it-pre order now!

Penguin

Mommy- theres a root on the trail! Make it go away! I want my Binkie

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6 years 11 months ago #42257 by boogenman
boogenman replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...

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6 years 11 months ago - 6 years 11 months ago #42253 by skidder
skidder replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...
I think it would benefit the Bicycle Industry if they came out with a simple 1X whatever shifting system for Recreational Riders.

I think the majority of people riding bicycles don`t really know how, or care how to shift.

The shifting systems on most entry level mountainbikes are way too complicated than they need to be.
Last Edit: 6 years 11 months ago by skidder.

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6 years 11 months ago #42219 by woodi
woodi replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...
Been riding a custom 1x6 on my 29er most this season. Shifts fine and covers most my needs with only 6 gears...hard to believe I know. Though I did just switch it up to 1x9 for an experiment. See if my legs are strong enough to push a little taller gearing now that we are well into the season.

Was running a 26t front ring with a homemade 12-34 6 speed cassette. Just went to 32t x 11-34 9 speed. We'll give that a test ride today and if I'm feeling whimpy and missing the grannies to much I'll go back to the 26t and be happy.

Modern bikes have far too many gears than they need.

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6 years 11 months ago #42215 by boogenman
boogenman replied the topic: Re: In all seriousness...

indigo22 wrote: What was so wrong with 1 1/8, external bottom brackets and 8 speed?


1 1/8 is flexy on aggressive trails, external BB's are pretty fancy, 8 speeds are good but 9 speed cog spacing shifts quicker.



Head tubes/steer tubes needed to change, tapered seems like a good mix of stiffness while still being light.

The 3 wheel sizes is getting squared away, I think we will see 27.5 become popular in the next couple years.

The combination and number of gears needed on a bike will always be a cluster F. Depending on where, what and how you ride your gear selection will differ. SRAM and Shimano will always be changing things up because the guys with deep pockets will awlays buy the new stuff. I could get away with a 2x5 setup at a place like Sprauge Brook or Hunter Creek.

I like the idea of a press fit BB on paper but in the real world it is always going to creak and make noise unless you maintain it after every wet ride.

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