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TOPIC: 650B vs 29er

Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 2 weeks ago #42272

I find my Jet9 handles just as quick as my 26er top fuel. The niner race bikes have steep head tube angles and this contributes to very quick handling. If you look at the visual comparison I posted a while back you see the geometry is just about the exact same (I've since lowered the handlebars to make it even more the same).

Get a nine race-geometry bike and it will handle as quick as you want it.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 2 weeks ago #42270

120mm 29er forks have been around for a while now, my Fox F29 is a 2009 model and 120mm.

While I do love my double squish 29er, I do miss the sharp and quick handling of smaller wheels. I'm very seriously thinking about converting my Sultan into a 650B over the winter.
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Fear the clown wheels!

"CX bikes are for bisexuals....you are either gay or straight...not both" -Trailhunter
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 2 weeks ago #42269

29'ers for the most part still have steeper head angles and shorter travel forks because of the slower maneuverability and a wheel that is flexy. Those two flawsdo not cater to the aggressive rider as much as the STRAVA fast lap time guys.
Scottish wrote:
but you would think more advances would have been made in the 29r divisions having been on the market for a decent amount of time now. small geometry changes are all 29'r have really seen along with more tire options.

Many of the bike manufactures already know that 27.5 is the future not 29 so they are focusing R&D there.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 2 weeks ago #42264

not only that, 29r forks have been out a lot longer and still pretty much limited to 100mm travel with some new forks just starting to get 120mm, and i think the new Scott all mountain 27.5 gets a 150mm. granted for racing purposes its not all that ideal. but you would think more advances would have been made in the 29r divisions having been on the market for a decent amount of time now. small geometry changes are all 29'r have really seen along with more tire options.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 2 weeks ago #42263

that is a fine looking bike. So why is it that the 27.5 gets a 67 degree head angle and the 29 is stuck with 69-70? This is compared to the 26 that get 67-68 degrees.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 3 weeks ago #42259

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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 3 weeks ago #42258

650b

reviews.mtbr.com/the-norco-roundup-re-designing-the-norco-range


"Stiffness and maneuverability could not be achieved using 29″ wheels"

This is what I have had a problem with all along.
Last Edit: 3 years 3 weeks ago by boogenman.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 1 month ago #41982

bennymack wrote:
The low rolling resistance will make it less necessary to go to 29" diameter although there will be more than a few hangers on I'm sure.

i'm always trying to hang on. it's all about "dancin' with the trail"
Velociped Jones is the future of racing and he was a P to A spawnling.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 1 month ago #41980

Combining this wave with my predicted tubular wave of the future, then I'm guessing tubular 650b will be the wheel of choice in the somewhat distant future (they still need to be made easier, more reliable, less expensive, and need more tire choices). Clinchers already can't compete with the weight. I read somewhere that there is an 1100g 29er wheelset that has a 26mm wide rim cavity! Light weight and super low rolling resistance. The low rolling resistance will make it less necessary to go to 29" diameter although there will be more than a few hangers on I'm sure.
Opinions are like pimples, they vary in amount and cover different areas.

There is no or, you're going to lose it.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 1 month ago #41979

Scottish wrote:
I dont see 650b fading either. Jamis, KHS are just a few that have had the wheels size in production bikes so far. I heard Scott will have one for production in 2013 along with several other companies. This is good because you can probably start seeing a drop in price of these bikes and start getting more options for tires, wheels and suspension forks for 650b specific.

When Eric (of Eric's Cycleworks) built my 650B's this spring, he informed me that Stan's was having a difficult time keeping up with production for that wheel size. Apparently demand is high.

More tire choices are definitely needed as well.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 1 month ago #41977

I dont see 650b fading either. Jamis, KHS are just a few that have had the wheels size in production bikes so far. I heard Scott will have one for production in 2013 along with several other companies. This is good because you can probably start seeing a drop in price of these bikes and start getting more options for tires, wheels and suspension forks for 650b specific.
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Re: 650B vs 29er 3 years 1 month ago #41969

Wheel size is up to the individual. Personally, I find 29 to be too big for my riding style and height (5'11"). I know Moto Mike would agree.

As for 650B fading away....I doubt that very much.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...
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