Topic-icon 650B vs 29er

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3 years 4 months ago #44227 by boogenman

kb voodoo wrote:

It would be cool if someone made a 24.5" wheeled bike.

Long travel (6"-8"), slack head tube angle.

You'd have stiffer, lighter wheels. Quick as lightning acceleration and razor sharp handing, especially in tight turns.

It would be a jumping machine too.

Don't forget, the top of the line Honda motocross bike has a 19" rear wheel, and a 21" front wheel.

10-12 years a ton of downhill bikes came with 24" wheels. Specialized sold the big hit downhill bike with a 26 up front and 24 in the back. Obviously the 24 trend didn't take off, they were just too slow and gave bad ground clearance. When racing overtook the freeride buck scenes they put the final nail in the coffin for 24"

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3 years 4 months ago #44226 by Lucas

Trek 650B

It seems that Trek has joined the 650B bandwagon.

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3 years 4 months ago #44225 by Lucas

You could also buy one of those Honda Motocross bikes for about 1/2 of the price for that S-works Carbon Camber.

The price of bikes is getting crazy. 29 or 26 inch.

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3 years 4 months ago #44224 by kb voodoo

Garick wrote:

Scott is virtually abandoning 26" for 2014, leaving it only to dh, freeride, dj and entry level mountain bikes.
www.bikemag.com/gear/scott-sports-bets-b...-bigger-wheel-sizes/

And specialized has eliminated 26" from the 2014 Stumpjumper FSR line except for one model. They are also ignoring 650B.
www.pinkbike.com/news/Specialized-2014-T...ber-stumpjumper.html

I didn't think much of the comment about 26" going away at first but it seems to be happening.

I feel like decisions like that are being made based strictly on sales and what the current trends are. But I'm sure they're making money, so good for them.


The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

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3 years 4 months ago #44223 by Garick

Scott is virtually abandoning 26" for 2014, leaving it only to dh, freeride, dj and entry level mountain bikes.
www.bikemag.com/gear/scott-sports-bets-b...-bigger-wheel-sizes/

And specialized has eliminated 26" from the 2014 Stumpjumper FSR line except for one model. They are also ignoring 650B.
www.pinkbike.com/news/Specialized-2014-T...ber-stumpjumper.html

I didn't think much of the comment about 26" going away at first but it seems to be happening.

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3 years 4 months ago #44222 by kb voodoo

It would be cool if someone made a 24.5" wheeled bike.

Long travel (6"-8"), slack head tube angle.

You'd have stiffer, lighter wheels. Quick as lightning acceleration and razor sharp handing, especially in tight turns.

It would be a jumping machine too.

Don't forget, the top of the line Honda motocross bike has a 19" rear wheel, and a 21" front wheel.


The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

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3 years 4 months ago #44216 by boogenman

indigo22 wrote:

I don't disagree. But I don't see the majority of brands supporting 26. It might be left to the boutique brands.

You need 29" wheels.

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3 years 4 months ago #44208 by kb voodoo

indigo22 wrote:

I don't disagree. But I don't see the majority of brands supporting 26. It might be left to the boutique brands.

That would actually be fine with me. I'm really only interested in those companies anyway.

My next build: Pivot Mach 4 or 5.7 (haven't decided yet).


The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

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3 years 4 months ago #44207 by indigo22

I don't disagree. But I don't see the majority of brands supporting 26. It might be left to the boutique brands.


lowly shop broom pusher since 2000

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3 years 4 months ago - 3 years 4 months ago #44205 by kb voodoo

I think about this every time I ride.

The way I see it, the only thing larger wheels are good for is:

- slightly improved traction
- better ability to roll over obstacles

On most, if not all trails, 95% of the surface is smooth. So the advantage of being able to roll over things only comes into play once in a while.

Even on the most slippery roots, I never have any issues with traction on 26" wheels. Learn how to hit the roots the right way.

Now, factor in the disadvantages of clown wheels:

- no rigidity in the wheel
- heavier
- they don't like tight turns

Bigger wheels might be better for extra tall riders, or people who are new to riding trails, but I think most advanced level riders will have more fun on 26.

(this comes from a guy who has owned one 29'er and two 650B's, and is now back on 26 for good)


The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...
Last Edit: 3 years 4 months ago by kb voodoo.

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3 years 4 months ago #44203 by indigo22

The future? What is your thought on that?


lowly shop broom pusher since 2000

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3 years 4 months ago #44202 by kb voodoo

26" is the past.....and future of mountain biking.


The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

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