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Are 26ers dead?
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TOPIC: Are 26ers dead?

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43859

[quote="Jon Sundquist" post=43858]Painfulldischarge wrote:

I would also point out that it takes a little while to get used to the bigger wheels. If you only do one ride on a 29er coming from the small wheels, I don't think you can make a judgment. I don't knwo what I adjusted (I could never be a coach), but after several rides and dialing in the geometry over and over again, my 29er handles just as well and is just as fun as the old 26".


You're making an assumption that I only rode it once, which is wrong. I did three rides of 20+ miles. I also adjusted the suspension for my weight and riding style. I am sure that if I rode the bike for a month or so, I would have it more dialed and could handle it better. What I liked was that I had the exact same bike that I ride in a 29" to make the comparision.

I also did not make a "judgment." I don't think a 29er is less fun, just different as I see the 26" vs 29". But my experience seems to be pretty common with most comments on about a 29er.
Buy the ticket, take the ride. -HST

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43860

Jon Sundquist wrote:
If you only do one ride on a 29er coming from the small wheels, I don't think you can make a judgment.


Truer words have never been spoken. I loved my 29'er for the first few rides, but after a while, not so much. Thank god for eBay.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43861

Moto Mike wrote:
That had to be a fun rig to go bombing down Ridgeline on! I love that trail.


There was so much to like in Dupont but Ridgeline was my favorite. I rode it twice and some in our group did it three times. We were planning on riding in Pisgah on day three until the guy at the local bike shop said "nothing you can ride in Dupont will prepare you for Pisgah."

EDIT****(Sorry Dan, I miscounted in the first picture I posted.)
The gang at the end of the airstrip.


I agree with the comments above. The 26er excels at change of direction, feels more natural over jumps and accelerates better. I only experienced one "I wish I had 29er wheels" moment in three days of riding when the front tire got partially hung up in some rocks. I'll keep the 29er hardtail for when I want a fast roller that climbs efficiently. The 26er will probably come out for everything else.
Not very fast but havin' fun!
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Last Edit: 1 year, 4 months ago by slower_than_u.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43862

Don't forget Rabb Himself. Here is a pic of Dan during one of his better water crossing moments.
Rabb.jpg
Last Edit: 1 year, 4 months ago by Scotto.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43863

Damn, I've been thinking about Asheville a lot in the past few weeks, and you guys aren't making it any easier.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43865

slower_than_u wrote:


. We were planning on riding in Pisgah on day three until the guy at the local bike shop said "nothing you can ride in Dupont will prepare you for pisgah.


What does that mean?
Last Edit: 1 year, 4 months ago by boogenman.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43867

boogenman wrote:
slower_than_u wrote:


. We were planning on riding in Pisgah on day three until the guy at the local bike shop said "nothing you can ride in Dupont will prepare you for pisgah.


What does that mean?


Dupont is fun, but it's small and there's really nothing difficult or technical there.

Pisgah is massive, and you can get into some really gnarly terrain a loooong way from where you parked. Just driving into that place is a journey.

Without knowing the riding level of the people he was talking to, it's the safe thing for him to say.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43870

Scotto wrote:
Don't forget Rabb Himself. Here is a pic of Dan during one of his better water crossing moments.

Guess that all depends on how you define 'better.' Figured a few pics of me with cold feet would've surfaced by now.
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Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43872

Jon Sundquist wrote:
Painfulldischarge wrote:
I think the more interesting question is: why are they dropping down to a 650b, if the 29ner is the be all end all?

That's an interesting take. I had always seen the 650B getting popular as the replacement for the 26" wheels. A way for people who don't want to go to 29" but still want the advantages of the bigger wheels.

Don't get me wrong. I am no partisan. I was pretty late to the party switching to a 29er. Whatever is the most fun is best for that person. I have a lot more fun on the 29er. I am not a racer.

I would also point out that it takes a little while to get used to the bigger wheels. If you only do one ride on a 29er coming from the small wheels, I don't think you can make a judgment. I don't knwo what I adjusted (I could never be a coach), but after several rides and dialing in the geometry over and over again, my 29er handles just as well and is just as fun as the old 26".


isn't there a lot of old data about how 650b was supposed to be the main wheel size for mtb but 26 was the original bmx/crusier wheel and since all the main asia suppliers had crazy inventory and were tool'd up for 26 it was forced into the market place as being the dominant wheel size? Tom Ritchey had 650b bikes and wheels in the 80's but it never took off. i am very interested in 650b for full suspension, but i cannot see ditching my 29'er hardtail...i would like to ride a good full suspension bike again, i am just torn between what the industry, press, and public are trying to figure out. that and i don't want a 30 lb bike...i know still working on the beer gut too...
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Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43875

GT had a few 650b MTB bikes in the early 90's. it was always a pain in the neck trying to explain to customers that their bike was basically useless if it had a bad tires or a tweaked rim. Rim brakes=26 wheels couldn't be swapped out.

I'm also waiting for the dust to settle until my next mountain bike purchase.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 4 months ago #43876

drabb wrote:
Scotto wrote:
Don't forget Rabb Himself. Here is a pic of Dan during one of his better water crossing moments.

Guess that all depends on how you define 'better.' Figured a few pics of me with cold feet would've surfaced by now.

Maybe a few pics of you with cold feet, but I think the video shows it best.
Still an awesome weekend of riding. My only comment to the question that started this thread (are 26ers dead?) is ride what feels best for you.
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year, 3 months ago #43986

boogenman wrote:
GT had a few 650b MTB bikes in the early 90's. it was always a pain in the neck trying to explain to customers that their bike was basically useless if it had a bad tires or a tweaked rim. Rim brakes=26 wheels couldn't be swapped out.

I'm also waiting for the dust to settle until my next mountain bike purchase.


Ah yeah. It keeps the industry in business too to come out with the next big thang;-) !
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Ride fast and look good
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