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Are 26ers dead?
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TOPIC: Are 26ers dead?

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43842

slower_than_u wrote:
kb voodoo wrote:
My objective is to have fun surfing the trails.


+1

"Efficiency" had no bearing in the decision to build this bike or the parts selection. I have a hardtail with clown wheels when I want efficiency and speed from A to B. This bike is about putting some fun back into riding.


+1 here too!

You really notice how much fun the little wheels are at Hunters or Eville.

Which Xfusion fork is that?

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43844

Not very fast but havin' fun!
www.bluelinebicyclerepair.com

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43845

slower_than_u wrote:


I have the same fork on my Epiphany. It makes you wonder if you'll ever plunk down the cash for a Fox fork again
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

Whenever I see a rider on the trail without a hat, it makes me mad. It's like, I wear a hat, so they should wear a hat too. Sometimes I say helpful things to them, like, "hey, where's your hat?".

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43846

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43848

I was surfing the trails at Dryer Rd. on my brand new Stache 8 29er yesterday after 6 years of riding little wheels. I have no regrets going to the big clown wheels! BTW, if you are looking to get on the trails, Dryer Rd was in excellent shape
you just gotta give'r

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43850


A quick review after three days of riding in NC.
This bike is way better than I am, especially going down hill. Going up is not terrible either. The X-Fusion Velvet has a very positive lockout, much better than the Rockshox Reba I'm used to. Used in tandem with the Propedal on the FoxRP23, the bike is transformed into a very acceptable climber. I think the Stan's Flow Ex wheels are the best part of this bike. They are stiff and they spread the tires out. I ran 24psi rear and 21 psi front and I ran over plenty of rocks and never felt like I was going to ding a rim. Unlike 29er wheels, I never felt the wheels winding up before the bike would turn. Just point it and it turns. I won't say which wheel size is better, only that I'm glad I have one with each.
Not very fast but havin' fun!
www.bluelinebicyclerepair.com

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43853

That had to be a fun rig to go bombing down Ridgeline on! I love that trail.
2009 Kingdom Trails Lightning Chaser MVP
2010 Asheville MVP

Fear the clown wheels!

"CX bikes are for bisexuals....you are either gay or straight...not both" -Trailhunter

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43854

Just got back from a week in North Georgia (days 1, 2, 3 (rainday dirt road) 4a, 4b, 5). All had 29ers (except Jim Bird and last time he came he had a demo 29er). I don't think anyone was thinking of efficiently getting from point A to point B. More on just having a total blast on swoopy singletrack and huge descents.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43855

I finally got a chance to really ride a 29ner this past weekend out in Reno, NV. They have sweet single track that goes from smooth fast and swoopy to big gnarly rock sections, and screaming downhills. Having never ridden anything but my 26er for the last say 15 years, it was a little different. I ride a 26 giant anthem and the bike I used in Reno was a 29 giant anthem, so I got the exact same bike with the big wheels.

Basically its what everyone on here said, once you get it moving its a steam roller through the technical rock gardens. I found it a little stiff in the turns and a little cumbersome on downhills; particularly loose down hills w/ cornering.

Regardless, the fun factor was huge. I wish I had my 26er, just for the feeling of secuity of my own bike on trails I'm not used to, and I think the 26" would have been better on the downhills and berms b/c you can just fold it into the corners. They also have small table tops and jumps (also large on some alternate lines-it is a real playground out there) that were built specifically for xc bikes on their race loop. I never felt real comfortable trying to air it out on the 29er.

I ride east coast PA trails. The 26" for me is more responsive in tight technical single track. I'm not sold on a 29er, but it was alot of fun to ride, fast on the uphills and rolls through the tech.

I think the more interesting question is: why are they dropping down to a 650b, if the 29ner is the be all end all?
Buy the ticket, take the ride. -HST

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43856

I think the more interesting question is: why are they dropping down to a 650b, if the 29ner is the be all end all?[/quote]

Necessity may well be the mother of invention.. but profits and market share is the father. Companies need to continue to develop and tweak to get people to open their wallets.

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43857

After all, the bike industry doesn't really care about what you ride.....they care about what you BUY.
The 1970's: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over cautious soccer mom's. It's just how we rolled...

Whenever I see a rider on the trail without a hat, it makes me mad. It's like, I wear a hat, so they should wear a hat too. Sometimes I say helpful things to them, like, "hey, where's your hat?".

Re: Are 26ers dead? 1 year ago #43858

Painfulldischarge wrote:
I think the more interesting question is: why are they dropping down to a 650b, if the 29ner is the be all end all?

That's an interesting take. I had always seen the 650B getting popular as the replacement for the 26" wheels. A way for people who don't want to go to 29" but still want the advantages of the bigger wheels.

Don't get me wrong. I am no partisan. I was pretty late to the party switching to a 29er. Whatever is the most fun is best for that person. I have a lot more fun on the 29er. I am not a racer.

I would also point out that it takes a little while to get used to the bigger wheels. If you only do one ride on a 29er coming from the small wheels, I don't think you can make a judgment. I don't knwo what I adjusted (I could never be a coach), but after several rides and dialing in the geometry over and over again, my 29er handles just as well and is just as fun as the old 26".
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