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Written by Thom Wright   
Thursday, 12 May 2011 16:27

The latest from Rich Edwards of IMBA, who is working on the Jakes Rock Project:

Hello Jakes Rocks Trails Team,

Based on the GIS calculations there are currently 28 miles of flagged trail corridor.  This translates into an estimated  32 miles of built trail as the GIS calculations typically are 10-20% short compared to when the built trail is measured due to all the dips and meanders created during the build.  

A two person team will be returning from May 18th through May 26th to refine the design and flag additional mileage. 

After that work is completed a final map, GIS data,  and a short document describing the various trails and their intended experience will be provided to NAMBA and the USFS by the end of June.   Hopefully that will be useful during the NEPA process and in marketing the project to potential donors.  

 
Written by Jon Sundquist   
Monday, 09 May 2011 11:53

I was fortunate to get some early season riding down in Georgia.  The riding was excellent because about 100% of it was on classic text book benchcut like this picture of the pinhoti trail->

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was thinking "WNYMBA has done some great trail building and lots of excellent bench cutting, but wouldn't it be great to ride this type of stuff 100% of the time".   Well, I have to say, the trail we built with the IMBA TCC was just as textbook (see below).  And it is going to be just as fun! 

Can't wait until the Mesa Trail is finished!

Check out more photos from Morgan of the TCC here.

 
Written by Fat Guy   
Tuesday, 26 April 2011 07:20

There will be a public meeting concerning the Jakes Rocks Trails Project Tuesday the 3rd of May (WNYMBA's 19th birthday!) at the Warren Public Library. Members of the International Mountain Bicycling Association and Trail Solutions will be present to answer questions and discuss their progress.

It is vital that we have a strong public showing of support at this meeting. Please make time to attend. This is the time to show support for growth of cycling related tourism in our area.

For further discussion, see this forum topic.

 
Written by Kevin Preston   
Monday, 09 May 2011 10:17

Thanks to all of the 40 participants in the Subaru IMBA Trail Care Crew weekend in Ellicottville this past weekend. This event ended up being a huge success and a heck of a lot of fun.

 

 
Written by Pete Dzirkalis, Just Riding Along, Bradford PA   
Monday, 04 April 2011 21:25

If you read my article Smooth Shifting on rear derailleurs, you probably learned some tricks that will be useful in adjusting the front derailleur as well.

The front derailleur can be tricky because the mechanic must first make several adjustments to align the front derailleur with the chainrings before making any useful adjustments. These alignments are made by eye. New front derailleurs come with a guide sticker on the outer plate to help line the outer plate with the teeth on the largest chainring.

Some front derailleurs are mounted in a fixed position on the frame and cannot be adjusted. If you have a fixed-position front derailleur (like and e-type or direct mount), you can skip the first step assuming the derailleur, frame, and chainrings on the crank were designed to work together.

 
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Our insurance company has "strongly suggested" that we tell you that Mountain Biking can be dangerous. If you're visiting this site it's very likely that you're already aware that if you insist on having a good time by riding your mountain bike, eventually you will almost certainly fall down and collect any number of boo-boos, dings and injuries, serious or otherwise, but we have to tell you anyway.

Mountain Biking is a potentially hazardous activity carrying a significant risk of bodily injury and even death. Mountain biking should only be undertaken if you have a complete awareness of these risks. You can reduce the level of risk by wearing a helmet and by riding within your own skill level.