• Facebook: wnymba
  • Twitter: wnymba
  • YouTube: wnymbavideo
Written by Jon Sundquist   
Tuesday, 15 February 2011 20:12

Following the comment period that ended last October, DEC has released the Final State Forest Management Plan. It is available at this link and the section that deals with trails management is at this link.

The initial draft was favorable for bicycles with some exceptions. The final version remains mostly unchanged from the draft with respect to bicycle access. Overall, this is GOOD NEWS.

The plan specifically states “Mountain bikes are permitted to travel on any existing road or trail on State Forests unless the road or trail is posted as closed for this use.” This is consistent with the recently promulgated Part 190 state regs formalizing bike access. The wording in the that stated that trails would have to be inspected prior to opening has been removed as we requested.

 
Written by george   
Tuesday, 15 February 2011 19:16

This video includes most of the Sprague Brook main loop.

It was shot before the "new" downhill was made and also doesn't include the "Bridge" trail or Foote Road.

The new web site allows us to post videos in place of articles. If this is a feature we like, maybe we can get a preview link on the Homepage.

Sorry for the slow pace, we were just trying to keep the riders together for video sake. Enjoy.

 
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 23 January 2011 12:39

With the original proposals for Bond Lake work dying due to bureaucracy, a WNYMBA member who is an attorney offered to develop a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to offer as an alternative to the Contract that the county legal folks wanted signed.  This was drafted up in 2009.  However, with the original champions of the project out of the picture, the original plans for the trails were no longer available and were lost.

In early 2010, the plans were found in a bunch of grainy scans, and at the same time, Brandon S. and Dave K. stepped up to try to push this project forward.  They scouted out the proposed route of the first new trail, and developed the red GPS track below:

icon

 

The blue tracks are possible future expansions.

Based on this scouting, and the MOU developed pro bono by the attorney, this proposal was submitted in May 2010:

Proposed MOU and Trail Proposal

 

 

 
Written by Jon Sundquist   
Wednesday, 09 February 2011 21:49

You all probably noticed that we have the login only on the front page of the website now.  We want to make sure everyone gets a look at the latest news from WNYMBA, and the place for that is the front page.

You can help keep the content on the front page fresh but submitting an article.  Anyone can do it!  You will see a new menu button on the left.  Click it and type or paste in your article.  An editor will take a look at it, edit if necessary (like make more paragraph breaks so it's easier to read), add in the "read more..." line.  Then it will show up as a feature article.

 
Written by Jim Allen   
Saturday, 20 November 2010 13:20

10. Your co-workers are too exhausted to ride farther or faster than you when everyone finally puts down the shovels.

9.   You get to play with big trucks in the woods just like childhood.

8.   Running that wheelbarrow through the woods and a half-mile down the trail makes you very happy that you sit in an office every day.

 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next > End >>

Page 16 of 16

Loading feeds...

Our insurance company has "strongly suggested" that we tell you that Mountain Biking can be dangerous. If you're visiting this site it's very likely that you're already aware that if you insist on having a good time by riding your mountain bike, eventually you will almost certainly fall down and collect any number of boo-boos, dings and injuries, serious or otherwise, but we have to tell you anyway.

Mountain Biking is a potentially hazardous activity carrying a significant risk of bodily injury and even death. Mountain biking should only be undertaken if you have a complete awareness of these risks. You can reduce the level of risk by wearing a helmet and by riding within your own skill level.