Selecting a Hitch Bike Rack for Mountain Biking

Are you looking for an easier way to carry your mountain bikes? With many of today’s SUVs coming with integrated trailer hitches and the popularity of aftermarket hitches, people are increasingly turning to hitch bike racks as a preferred alternative for carrying bikes. This article reviews some of the advantages and disadvantages that hitch mounted bike racks offer as well as some of the variations that available on the market today. With the wide range of products available, choosing the right hitch bike rack isn’t always easy. This article is designed to help you narrow the field and to identify a hitch mounted bike rack that fits your needs without breaking the bank.

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Mountain biking on upward climb

"Over the last two years, it seems like people want to go riding again," said Dennis Baldwin, owner of the Ellicottville Bike Shop. "About 10 years ago, it was super-popular and now people are coming back to it. ... We have younger people, older people, guys and girls. It's pretty cool. Even in the small town of Ellicottville, I've had four younger, local guys, who hadn't been mountain biking, getting their own bikes and riding out in the woods. It's great to see new faces."

"There are two ways we see growth," said Kevin Preston, president of the Western New York Mountain Bicycling Association. "We're primarily a trail advocacy group and we work on adding and maintaining trails, not just for mountain biking, but for others to enjoy.

"Membership is the other way to measure growth, and right now we have about 160 members. That number has doubled in the last three or four years and it's still growing. More people want access to public outdoor places."

Indeed, mountain biking conversation has two components -- the sport and the environment. The two work together, as mountain bikers carry a strong sense of respect for nature and the trails, in part because of their collective ethic and in part because they need access to trails which often are on county or state lands.

Click HERE to read the rest of the Buffalo News Article by Amy Moritz

Sprague Brook Trail Day this Saturday!

Come join us at Sprague Brook Park and help us tweak some of WNY's finest single track.  Starting at 10am and ending in the afternoon sometime.

Were planning a west side tune up starting with that big mud hole that never seems to go away.  Plus a few more projects.

Meet at the main bathrooms by 9:50, then were going to drive up top to the upper campground parking lot (by the dumpster).

Lunch and tools will be provided.  Wear some good work shoes and brings some gloves and drinking water.  I use an old pair of riding gloves and wear my Camelbak.

We'll see what we can get done.  Contact me (Scotto) or Greg at SLIDERS for any additional info or questions.  Hope to see you Saturday!

IMBA visit is a huge success

Thanks to all of the 40 participants in the Subaru IMBA Trail Care Crew weekend in Ellicottville this past weekend. This event ended up being a huge success and a heck of a lot of fun.

 

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Taking The Mystery Out of the Front Derailleur

If you read my article Smooth Shifting on rear derailleurs, you probably learned some tricks that will be useful in adjusting the front derailleur as well.

The front derailleur can be tricky because the mechanic must first make several adjustments to align the front derailleur with the chainrings before making any useful adjustments. These alignments are made by eye. New front derailleurs come with a guide sticker on the outer plate to help line the outer plate with the teeth on the largest chainring.

Some front derailleurs are mounted in a fixed position on the frame and cannot be adjusted. If you have a fixed-position front derailleur (like and e-type or direct mount), you can skip the first step assuming the derailleur, frame, and chainrings on the crank were designed to work together.

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Our insurance company has "strongly suggested" that we tell you that Mountain Biking can be dangerous. If you're visiting this site it's very likely that you're already aware that if you insist on having a good time by riding your mountain bike, eventually you will almost certainly fall down and collect any number of boo-boos, dings and injuries, serious or otherwise, but we have to tell you anyway.

Mountain Biking is a potentially hazardous activity carrying a significant risk of bodily injury and even death. Mountain biking should only be undertaken if you have a complete awareness of these risks. You can reduce the level of risk by wearing a helmet and by riding within your own skill level.