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Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
Written by Ben Clauss   
Monday, 03 February 2014 20:13

The hemlock woolly adelgid, is a serious pest of Eastern hemlock in the northeastern states. This insect was first reported in southeastern Pennsylvania in the late 1960s and has spread to both ornamental and forest hemlocks. The hemlock woolly adelgid sucks sap from the young branches which results in premature needle drop and branch dieback. These insects display several different forms during their life cycle, including Newly hatched nymphs called "crawlers" that produce white, waxy, cottony or wool-like tufts that cover their bodies throughout their life. The white-woolly masses are 3 mm or more in diameter. The presence of these woolly flecks on twigs and at the base of the hemlock needles is the most obvious indicator of an infestation.

If you see this pest in our forests let WNYMBA know so that we can notify land managers!  If caught early this pest can be controlled.

 

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